History of Cotton

with Teju Adisa-Farrar, Sha'Mira Covington

Part of the Series:

History of...

in partnership with

In the growing sustainability movement, organic cotton has been used as a tool of greenwashing by many brands while leaving many questions about its history, farming and processing unanswered. This course looks at the origins of cotton and how they relate to colonialism, cultural erasure and the ongoing struggle of Black Brown and Indigenous Peoples around the world.

Photo of Teju Adisa-Farrar

Teju Adisa-Farrar

Teju is a Jamaican-American writer, poet and geographer. Her focus is on contemporary and historical Black geographies as they relate to the environment, urban ecologies and culture. Having lived in 7 different countries, Teju uses a transnational lens that is informed by history, art and activism. Her work supports developing alternatives, creating infrastructure for regenerative projects, and participating in co-creation. She advocates for and speaks about environmental and climate justice focusing on urban areas, communities of color, and postcolonial populations.

Photo of Sha'Mira Covington

Sha'Mira Covington

Sha’Mira Covington is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors and the Institute of African American Studies at the University of Georgia, USA. Her expertise is in Black fashion and cultural studies, focusing on the commodification of Black bodily discourses (embodiment) within the fashion-industrial complex and diversity issues in fashion media.